[GW2] Mawdrey

Mawdrey is one of the chase items for the first half of Season 2 in Guild Wars 2. Unlike most of the other chase items, Mawdrey is not random-chance loot. It is quite the opposite. Mawdrey is a large treasure hunt, crafting spree, and tree destroying quest rolled in to one.

In The Dragon’s Reach: Part 1 sequence of story instances, players begin to receive items when each instance is completed. The first one appears in the story instance Uprooting the Iron Marches, which involves defending the charr region from planty mordrem attacks. One of the rewards is a Mysterious Seed with the instructions to “[p]lant in a Ley Line Infused Clay Pot to germinate”. The capitalization of course notes that another item will be needed, and they come uncompleted in the later story instances of the same chapter.

I say “uncompleted” because in The Waypoint Conundrum instance the reward is a Ley Line Infused Stone, which needs to have its matrix disrupted according to the item description. Double-clicking on the Stone points one towards Lion’s Arch where Scarlet’s Breachmaker wreckage still has its drill in a leyline. This represents the first mechanic that repeats nearly a dozen times. The player gets an item, but then needs to head off to some area of Tyria to modify the item, or later on just retrieve the item wholesale.

I really liked this portion of building Mawdrey. Getting 100% map completion was one of my favorite parts of Guild Wars 2, and heading back to out-of-the-way areas is quite fun for me. It took me into part of the Maguuma Jungle in Brisban Wildlands that I had completely forgotten, and it took me back to some of the open world minidungeons, which I enjoy. That part of the Mawdrey quest I quite enjoyed.

The megaserver technology was also working very well. It was only this week that I started finishing up the final stage of Mawdrey, and I needed to get to the Font of Rhand and Forsaken Fortune minidungeons. I figured that since I was weeks late, I would be doing it alone. Nope. In each minidungeon I had about half-dozen fellow players along with me. That was really cool.

Mawdrey is not all fun and games. There is some bit of work included. The funny bit of work is felling high-level trees for a chance at Foxfire Clusters. Heuristically, I’d say there was a 3-5% chance for each chop. All told there are about 100 Foxfire Clusters required for the complete Mawdrey. I spent a lot of time re-logging characters in Malchor’s Leap where 6 pretty trees stood in a row. I was never alone in chopping that wood. However, these are tradable items that were going for upwards of 70-80 silver each. Now as people complete their Mawdreys, the amount is half that. Still 40 gold worth of tree gas is not something to sneeze at, but players have the choice of grinding it out themselves.

I thought on how with Foxfire Clusters alone, ArenaNet was successful in putting a fun, temporary change to the market. It created opportunity for people that just wanted to run around and smash trees. It had a huge effect on the supply of wood, which might be the longest lived effect of this. And, it was all tied to a luxury item. I hope ArenaNet got lots of good data on it. I quite enjoyed the market change. These changes were also felt in the Sunstone Lump market with an increase of 2000%. Some lodestone markets got a 25%+ jump as well.

Again, once players got past the treasure hunt above it was all economics or farming. Even with the new zone, a player could just straight up buy a Clay Pot from the Trading Post rather than do a small bit of farming and crafting. Other patient players could fill orders from rich and impatient players for creating the once/day plant food recipes. I was finding that for those, in the peak, each plant food packet was making me 1-2 gold profit.

Ultimately, the prizes were 3 back item skins, 2 exotic back pieces, an ascended back piece with selectable stats, and finally a plant that eats Bloodstone Dust to digest it into something at least salable. People have reported getting some rare items, but for the most part it will be vendor trash. Still, an option to convert Bloodstone Dust in to something usable is pretty nice. I feel though, economically, the ascended back piece is going to be the main prize.

I always liked taking a keepsake from each update of the Living Story in Guild Wars 2, and I feel Mawdrey is one of the best in terms of entertainment to achieve and worth once gained. I liked its effect on the economy, especially since for the most part it was a luxury item (arguable with the ascended back piece part). Still, with the first half of Season 2 and this item, it really feels like ArenaNet is gaining mastery of their game. I am looking forward to future crafting hunts.

–Ravious

6 thoughts on “[GW2] Mawdrey”

  1. Every original piece from the Mawdrey quest is still in whatever slot, in whoever’s pack, it randomly landed back when I did the Living Story. Last night I was doing it on my second account (I needed a couple of weeks to summon up the enthusiasm for those tedious fights, although, as always, it seemed to go much faster second time through) and I cursed when I saw those white elephants appear in the rewards.

    I have a strong antipathy to long, convoluted quests in general. I try to avoid them whenever possible. If they are essential for progression or if there’s a specific reward that I really want I will grit my teeth and grind through them. In this case that isn’t an issue because the back items are beyond hideous and the bloodstone-eating plant is fatuous – if I hated bloodstone dust that much I’d just destroy it – I could clearly make enough money by selling the items I’d need to GET the plant in the first place to be able to afford to BUY every green or yellow item it would give me in the next five years!

    None of which is to suggest I think it’s a bad quest or that the rewards are poor. It’s a perfectly decent quest of its kind and the rewards are on a par with most GW2 quest rewards. It’s just not my cup of tea.

    What I would like – and would (albeit grudgingly) do a long quest to obtain – is a Collector’s Cabinet for all these disposable interim quest items. I value them far more than any useable rewards because they are the true mementos of the stories in which I have played my part. My bank and bags are stuffed to bursting with Found Heirlooms, Mysterious Soggy Bags, Map Fragments and the like.

    As for back items (with which ANet appear to have a clinical obsession issue) I’m much more excited about the upcoming crafted ones. They look really good!

  2. Every original piece from the Mawdrey quest is still in whatever slot, in whoever’s pack, it randomly landed back when I did the Living Story. Last night I was doing it on my second account (I needed a couple of weeks to summon up the enthusiasm for those tedious fights, although, as always, it seemed to go much faster second time through) and I cursed when I saw those white elephants appear in the rewards.

    I have a strong antipathy to long, convoluted quests in general. I try to avoid them whenever possible. If they are essential for progression or if there’s a specific reward that I really want I will grit my teeth and grind through them. In this case that isn’t an issue because the back items are beyond hideous and the bloodstone-eating plant is fatuous – if I hated bloodstone dust that much I’d just destroy it – I could clearly make enough money by selling the items I’d need to GET the plant in the first place to be able to afford to BUY every green or yellow item it would give me in the next five years!

    None of which is to suggest I think it’s a bad quest or that the rewards are poor. It’s a perfectly decent quest of its kind and the rewards are on a par with most GW2 quest rewards. It’s just not my cup of tea.

    What I would like – and would (albeit grudgingly) do a long quest to obtain – is a Collector’s Cabinet for all these disposable interim quest items. I value them far more than any useable rewards because they are the true mementos of the stories in which I have played my part. My bank and bags are stuffed to bursting with Found Heirlooms, Mysterious Soggy Bags, Map Fragments and the like.

    As for back items (with which ANet appear to have a clinical obsession issue) I’m much more excited about the upcoming crafted ones. They look really good!

  3. The wife and I react almost to the opposite of Bhagpuss’ thoughts on long convoluted quests — we generally love them. Over in EQ2, one of the (many) things we have found that we really like is the heritage and signature quests. Long, complicated quest chain… sure, sign us up!

    That having been said, we’ll probably never get Mawdrey. It would require making yet another stab at fractals. Um… no. I think I have to wash my fish.

    I hate that we don’t enjoy fractals. We were serious raiders in WoW — killed Arthas in 10 man ‘strict’ mode, and obsessively stared at our server (and then world) ranking back in the day. In vanilla WoW we practically lived in dungeons, ran lots of people through keying quests. We used to 2 man them, trying to see how much we could do. After WoW we moved to Guild Wars, and did literally every scrap of content they had — did every mission in every campaign in hard mode. Vanquished every zone. Got our calligrapher titles. Picked up all of the “Eternal Conqueror” titles for all of the end game areas.

    But, you see, all of these things require more planning and good decision making rather than ferret like reflexes or precision jumping skills.

    Just how important are those reflexes? Well, in Jeromai’s outstanding guide (found at http://tinyurl.com/GW2combatguide ), he recommends using a dodge button rather than double tapping, partly to avoid dodge-rolling on a jumping puzzle, but partly because double tapping is too slow. Pushing a key twice is too slow. Think about that.

    And jumping? We never made it to Mai Trin in the Aetherblade dungeon, back when it was in living story. Tried to, several times, in our guild group. But neither of us are any good at jumping. The Inquest boss in there required you to rapidly jump on some boxes or get killed by a rotating laser. And we died… over and over. We just couldn’t do it. Fractals were a similar story — tried on several different occasions. Sometimes could make it through the Mossman swamp, then never got out of the Dredge one.

    It’s a pity. My wife is the sort that is an obsessive completionist achiever, the sort that tries to finish everything. She loves pets too — back in WoW she has all of the pet and mount achievements, loved getting them. And she prefers to “earn” a pet rather than “buy” one. So I told her that, if she really wanted to get Mawdrey, I’d be willing to gird my loins and have another go at fractals. She just kind of looked at me.

    I don’t want this to come off as too much “get off my lawn.” But I might be too old for ANet’s lawn.

    1. I was going to mention having to go into icky Fractals with icky PUGS, but honestly with the LFG (press Y), and being on low Fractal levels it was all rather easy to do. I could only do it once/day to get the thing, but still they’ve made it rather doable as long as you understand the mechanics of it.

      1. You misunderstand the problem. We don’t mind “icky PUGS”. I’m happy to play with strangers. In other games, I teach. I was an author at Tankspot for WoW. We understand the mechanics just fine. But executing them… that we really struggle to do. What to do is easy to understand, but I find it very challenging to actually do them.

        For me, moving about using the “crystal jumping skill” in Dry Top is *hard*. Many, many attempts.

        1. What I can suggest is patience and practice. No one is born with twitch skills overnight, the muscle memory will take time to build.

          When I played FPSes some time back, I started out horrible, compensated by watching clever people play (and where they stood, special spots to ambush people, etc.) and just kept playing until I got fairly decent. And now that I haven’t done it in ages, I’m sure I’ve regressed back to horrible again.

          Don’t forget that I’m playing from the other side of the world, so I actually have to compensate for a good 250ms more latency, so single-tapping dodge for me goes through a lot better than double-tapping.

          Age may slow reflexes, but I’m not that young myself and not that much content in GW requires that much precision, beyond oh.. things like Liadri.

          If you put together your own patient team on something like Fractals 1, it’s possible to cycle away from more annoying fractals that require simultaneous coordination like mossman and go through them slowly.

          It may even be possible to 2-4 man it, if “icky PUGs” are too impatient. I know I -almost- soloed Uncategorized fractal 1 until the final bunch of bosses was too much, though it took like an hour of patient plodding and quite a few learning deaths.

          If you ever think Mawdrey’s something you want to go for, I’ll be happy to run fractal 1 with you guys for the five days to get your pristine fractal relics if you see me on and send me a tell – Finder Blazebane. (Hell, I’ve fallen from Uncategorized harpies and on Colossus too many times to count now.)

Comments are closed.